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It all starts with writing

Among the people who have shaped contemporary type culture, Gerrit Noordzij is one of the most remarkable characters. According to him and his influential book, The Stroke (1985), it all starts with writing. In this profile, Jan Middendorp interviews the Noordzij and explains his impact on the world of western type design. Read more

New in TYPE

Fonts and Leading on the Campaign Trail

Fonts and Leading on the Campaign Trail

Nolen Strals and Bruce Willen, typographers and designers with studios in Baltimore and New York, have taken a close look a the type of the U.S. midterm elections. Some campaigns have innovative type branding. Some use . . . Gotham. [A preview of TYPE No. 3] Read more

Variable, who?

Variable, who?

Two new technologies—variable fonts and parametric type—promise to solve the same problems. The major differences? You need to be a skilled type designer to create the former, but it takes only 5 minutes and a few clicks to spit out the latter. For professional type designers, variable fonts might seem like the obvious choice, especially with all major type design programs supporting the technology. But for graphic designers still waiting for the right font, variable or otherwise, parametric type looks like the future. And the French program Prototypo is here to deliver that future. Read more

The future is here

The future is here

If you live long enough and pay some attention along the way, you can begin to see the direction of history and to get an idea of what is going to happen next. You’re not necessarily right, but humans like to make patterns, so here we go. This is Roger Black's letter, published in TYPE No. 3. Read more

The first Uruguayan printing press

The first Uruguayan printing press

Through a series of 11 artifacts, Gabriel Benderski takes us through the compelling history and impressive visuals of the earliest presses in the Uruguayan territory. Read more

Off the page, and off the screen

Off the page, and off the screen

Futurist Gerard Mallandrich shows us how our digitally-built environment might look in a few short years, thanks to the advent of augmented reality. Read more

Double the type with Pangram Pangram

Double the type with Pangram Pangram

Mathieu Desjardins started his Montreal-based foundry, Pangram Pangram, after the surprise success of his first typeface. Since then, the foundry has published a total of 17 typefaces, but unlike most foundries, Pangram Pangram allows users to download their fonts completely free… Mat says the practice is based on trust, adding that the “foundry of the future” will prioritize designers over profits. Read more

The Zen of Art

The Zen of Art

Designers who wish they were called artists, need to read James Cahill’s new book, Ways of Being: Advice for Artists by Artists. In it, designers will find practical advice at any stage in an artist’s or designer’s career, fascinating quotes from some of the world’s best artists, and 168 pages of pure, photo-free typography. Read more

New York’s new Poster House

New York’s new Poster House

New York is a city of many museums, with no shortage for creative types: From the MoMA to the Rubin and seemingly everything in between. And while the city is home to the world's largest collection of old posters—Philip Williams Posters—there is no poster museum. That’s set to change in late 2018 with the opening of Poster House. Read more

Gerard Unger (1942-2018): An original type designer

Gerard Unger (1942-2018): An original type designer

A short tribute to the great contemporary type designer, Gerard Unger Read more

The secret Grammy nominated designer

The secret Grammy nominated designer

Design might come as an afterthought for most musicians—but not Harrison Mills. The graphic design graduate, who makes up one half of electronic group ODESZA, keeps his visual passion alive through the band's branding, album art, music videos, and stage animations. Read more

Designed by those who can’t read

Designed by those who can’t read

Unlike most type designs, the Illitera faces are not meant to be legible. Their idiosyncratic shapes preclude any typesetting use—especially for the people who created them: illiterates. Designers Nicolas Bernklau and Tobias Müller built the 18 fonts with the collaboration of 8 Germans unable to read. Read more